RESULTS FOR Reviews
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Charlotte’s Web, Animal Farm, Mort(e)

Sabra Embury

04.14.15

Mort(e) extends the lineage of political allegory with charming, apocalyptic flair. Sabra Embury reviews.

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Memory As Story: A Review of Find Me

Amber Sparks

03.31.15

Amber Sparks dives into the memory, loss, and apocalypse in Laura van den Berg’s Find Me.

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Place, Family, Face, Name: on Ibeyi’s Ibeyi

Kati Heng

03.26.15

Kati Heng listens to French-Cuban duo Iyebi’s self-titled debut album and tries to wrestle with the ways we can and cannot handle musical heritage.

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Blurred Lines: As We Know by Amaranth Borsuk and Andy Fitch

Gina Myers

03.18.15

As We Know redefines the writer/editor relationship by blurring all boundaries between them. Gina Myers reviews.

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Jenny Erpenbeck’s The End of Days

Jace Brittain

02.19.15

The End of Days explores the strange terrain between life and death. Jace Brittain reviews.

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You Got Somethin’ To Say?: A Review of Andrew Worthington’s Walls

Norman Feliks

02.12.15

Norman Feliks investigates the hauntingly Nietzschean aspects of Andrew Worthington’s debut novel, Walls.

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The Master At Play

Jake Valento

02.09.15

Jake Valento looks closely at Paul Thomas Anderson’s Inherent Vice and finds a film that’s more than the sum of its shaggy-dog pot-smoked parts.

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“We had 3D in my day and we called it AMERICA.”" On Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals

Mark Baumer

02.05.15

Mark Baumer goes deep line by line into the bloodbath of language that is Patricia Lockwood’s Motherland Fatherland Homelandsexuals.

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On Bjork’s Vulnicura

Nicholas Grider

01.26.15

Nicholas Grider takes a look at the emotional heft of Bjork’s latest.

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A Review of Don Mee Choi’s Freely Frayed,ᄏ=q, & Race=Nation

Joyelle McSweeney

01.20.15

Freely Frayed takes a look at how the work of Korean poets such as Don Mee Choi and Kim Hyesoon grapple with the US’s manipulation of their home country as a military toy. Joyelle McSweeney reviews.