Waiting for Goals / [to be chanted]

Andrew Wells

09.04.18

soccer-field

1) The following as a pre-match segment / setting out of tactic(s) / formation / plan— football [allegorically?] becoming a bodily [ individually, institutionally & otherwise ] enactment of deconstruction[1]

2) Essay as mad[2], as relinquishing of control[3] / to open / parallels / not to be closed lest—

3) metaphor might [ imperfectly b/c metaphor, here valuing coherence > consistency[4]] extend as something like : governing body (FIFA, UEFA, FA, &c.) ¹[5] institutional [i.e. university presses] & institutionalised + institutionalising publishing [Faber & Faber / Graywolf / Picador etc.] / ‘beautiful game’ ¹ corpus of ever-expanding + shifting totality of texts, both canonical + other, marginalised— / single match ¹ single text / players as readers + writers and/or component parts [i.e. line, chapter, character, word] put into play by readers + writers [each interlinked—

4) not ever a self-containment on the cards / permeable, aphoristic [insofar as players [writers, readers alike] require at once radical individuality + separation from a spectacle to invent, to rupture the political [or on-pitch] moment + conformity [i.e. kit, badges] to be present at all[6]

5) taking [ individual ? ] player / reader, writer, or other participatory component [after all, it is metaphor] /

6) maybe, line [?] /

7) of [a/the] single match|text / to mark + re-mark the match, & by extension, the beautiful game / + vice versa

8) i.e. via specialist equipment, or toolbox / equip : to fit up, arrange + set out to water[7] / -ment suffix denoting the result of the verb[8])

9) / keeper braced / all at sea / [drop in drop in [ drop of –

10) goalkeeper’s, an author, superficially mark(s) the production of his contribution to (be)long & yet to the beautiful game & yet neither match nor keeper voided in absence of : gloves / padded shorts / No.1 shirt / + neither gloves nor padded shirt nor No.1 voided in absence of the beautiful game [ one wear’s shorts, utilises the No.1 / elsewhere ] / a gloveless game w/ felled nets [ ‘four jackets for four goalposts’ ] + bumpy ground = loss of the game = encouragement of play ‘s : high of ‘fleetness, furtherance, tiredness’ / breathless ‘skids in the dark’[9]

11) Keeper’s ! As a hoarsening of the throat, that terror to front line + back line, that, ‘to all flown here, this be my 18yrds’

12) that > the spectacle of the corners crying : No. 1 ! I am your keeper ! No. ! This be my goalie ! No. 1 ! The signing our great stopper ! No. 1! You’ll álwáys bé our keeper !

13) #99 A.C. Milan’s Don/narumma, keeper who dared [ note: a persistence of the possessive even over the [ most commercially viable, + therefore only noticeable ] maverick ]

14) Eng vs USA, 2010, an apology from ITV : the first action was missed, so have a replay, and a second apology, technological issues, but bear in mind that what you missed sets the tone for this World Cup, England off the mark, all thanks to Stevie G.[10]

15) Eng vs USA, 2010, Rob Green has ruined our lives[11]

16) Eng vs USA, 2010, intertextual connectives, collaborations at play in the text [ Clint Dempsey + Tim Howard + the passers [whoever they are] ³ Rob Green’s hand + Stevie G’s boot ] = calling an instant among instances / player among players / kick among kicks / [ drops holding the hands of drops holding the hands of an ocean [ being held ? ]

17) prevention of simple classification of components of authors &c. / invention ¹ originality / poem not in this or that poet / goal not in this or that player [‘twas a pass[12]] / reading > spectating / reading as necessitatification of a kaleidoscopic morph upon each reopening of the eye[13]

18) & so, interconnectivity, unoriginality[14], as forms of handholding, player to player to / vulnerable + positively gentle + violent [ held up or pulled up / to present participle [see, death of cells + house paradoxes ]

19) inseparability, team chemistry given unto an eleven by risk and forms of running : / mixes, darts, decoys, overlaps, criss-crosses, rotation

20) to score necessitates movement + blend + risk + furtherance

21) an attacking movement [ joining battle[15] , risk of death b/c literally, dude, they’ll kill us if we play this way / sport as play fight / reading + writing as tug of war / invention might take a defender/attacker to desired end, for an act whose intentions are anticipated is always already tackled

22) case example : keeper Ali Ahamada, @90+5 minutes, goes up for a free kick, + equalises for Toulouse to the dismay of Stade Rennais[16]

23) Ahmada holds himself to another light, returns to the box of a by-gone half, like a narrative’s end point might to (re)iterate a theme or hold itself at a second angle, return to its opening

24) see: Inside Llewyn Davis / his ending flat, sprawled upon a tarmac where it all began, upon the closure of ever-same folk songs sung to an ever-same audience

25) form(al) risk / towards a given telos then / this invention presents : depression’s monotony + sense of imprisonment &c.

26) Ahamada’s movement to the opposing half constitutes a similar repetition w/ a difference, transference in space creating a partial consonance (CON) / a space Ahamada inhabited and re-inhabits / echo of his position as it moves to a new [accidental, where a passive spectator is concerned] end, physically + figuratively

27) each movement [see, 15] marks [bodily + tactically &c.] a building of rhythm, a rising _ falling, in waves

28) pass forwards as contraction, pass backwards as dilation / as breathing space / stressed + un-stressed + pause + unpause[17]

29) Toussaint claims tension as a cause for football’s perishability[18] / not accounting for (re)iterability, one in part aided by technology [ TV, replays, to football as the printing press to poetry ] / enabling of staggered viewings, each necessarily bearing different circumstances. Sara Ahmed describes re-reading + re-writing as ‘turning a word this way and that.. [how each will] catch a different light every time it is turned’[19]

30) Ahmed’s approach to (re-)reading reminds me of a defender initially grappling with the attacker before watching post-match iterations [critical opinions + interpretations of Gary Neville &c.] of the attacker’s inventiveness [what did I read right, what did I read wrong] so as to better cope, to invent upon a new understanding in the rematch. This criticism holds w/out the spectacle, classmates plotting at how to do better vs Class 2 in the lunch break tomorrow. These constitute continuations of an interactive reading, reading as a constant instruction in—

31) Invention then opening out a discourse + play + subversion prior to the reader’s coming into conscious[20] / defender positively baffled, left in the wake of a trickster’s blaze—

32) Invention then makes possible new acts of invention[21] : a) attacker’s invention as deformation of a previous attacker’s deformation (ad infinitum (?)) of a cultural practice of attacking play / b) defender’s hand forced in a reactionary deformation of the defensive traditions to i) anticipate an attacker’s ensuing move ii) recover lost ground [see, Gordon Banks vs Pele, Pele cannot believe his header was read]

33) to be considered inventive is to be legitimised by pundits + classmates &c., to be on the highlight reel, watched back at new angles for yr invention’s next undiscovered nuance / nuance an answer to Touissant, how far a movement in a poem or goal can be unravelled as a source of consequence [or, score : hints of composition, etching[22]]

34) to be legitimised is to (be)come an inaugural event & yet to be so institutionalised is to be no longer eventful a) no longer invention but invented [ maybe, part-contrary here to Attridge, invention as intuitive and invented as institutional ] i) tense-wise ii) institutional ownership-wise / superlatives in flux, interrogated by invention, in light of Ederson’s double-save is Banks really the most inventive keeper (?) Shakespeare not Mayer (?) These questions are persisting.

35) Stray kicks : here is a conflation w/ greatest & iconic, a fallacious leap from fame to value judgement [ the foundation for value judgements ascribed to goals, — be it brevity, technique, teamwork, bravery – varies between readers as judgements of ‘literariness’ do]

36) Stray kicks : a cue for contretemps[23], an opening of the space in behind for a counter / a shift against the run of play, impending doom turned upon its head.

37) Reminisces a kerfuffle

38) reminisces a tug of war

39) from Scots-Gaelic / car – twist, bend [ a typical act of self-defence is the twisting of the arm that throws the punch ] / fuffle – disorder – among the ranks of a once dominant force[24].

40) Stevie G’s England all a-daze

41) Molly Bergin + Steven J Fowler + Rosa Campbell request a play-fight, tug of war, collaborative invention / readers + writers at play in a single text.

42) Rosa Campbell’s ‘Second Person’ utilises square brackets to set up a hesitancy in the refrain ‘[it’s a beautiful morning]’. The reader is called to decide upon how the abstract is taken, as well as to, elsewhere, discern, deny and accept, pronouns: ‘yes, you, whose forehead I / furrow, whose heads our hands half-shave’[25]. There is a semantic, imaged violence done in the facial contortions, phonetic violence of the ‘half-shave’ fricative, and, most of all, a violence in the trickery and tension of the poem’s dense action + blurred identity, in the call for an un-reductive figuring (Clarke) of dysmorphia.

43) Molly Bergin’s ‘Sun’, laid out cuneiform, a square, like a middle tarsus, each mark an inscription in its section of the grid. It is wordsearch-esque, yet linear. The sun and whiteness are jarring, dissonant, as one stares directly at them. The reader is subsequently twisted, joining in the visceral to squint closely, to wince on finding the ‘c u |  t   o  /  p  e  n   e  d’[26]

44) Steven J. Fowler – in ‘Laid out flat upon my back’ – has a similar sense of play to Rosa Campbell on the second person pronoun: ‘alone on the water / I feared you’d drown, & you did, in fact / pursued by the retarded child, the bean’[27]. Here, there is a blurring of identities and narrative in the line-breaks (which phrase follows from which?) to the point at which it feels quite surreal, and compounded by images such of ‘llamas’, ‘green curtains / were your chest’, ‘the plasma of children’s blood’, the reader might find themselves in a violent, Thanatic ‘land of nod’, an after-dark anxiety is there, but its source, with ambiguities of identity and location, is unclear and all the more involves the reader, left to place themselves in a black place. The bean could be a qualification of the retarded child, or that which must flee, or both, and these deft movements encourage the reader’s involvement in an ultimately violent poem upon ‘a scale of men / who want something’[28].

45) The goalkeeper makes the concession that to misread might be to concede & that to concede might be to misread goes the concession.

46) Invention not – by definition – guaranteed / constant / persisting, but rising + falling _ spiking + lulled _

47) begs – why does a spectator stay 90 minutes?

48) begs – how + in what light can one match or one text be considered a site of spectatorship? This is a match of two halves.

49) if spectatorship, metaphor is requesting a second form of reading / questions of who, of why, of passivity / zoned out to ‘pass the time’[29]

50) is it [?] – establishment [ established publishers, academia, boardrooms &c. ] stifling critical voices in sport + literature for the sake of the spectacular money machine’s ‘frantic drive’[30], + for its political familiarity + for its power, for the [white male] institution.[31]

51) it is post-accolade that Faber & Faber welcome the maverick, Eimear McBride[32] / that Man Utd welcome Paul Pogba / proviso for welcoming of inventiveness : the guaranteed bettering of that present spectacle’s commercial prosperity

52) not then the meekness of the reader/fandom but an assumed inaction in them + a subsequent actualised timidity among publishing’s ruling elite

53) elite then propagating conformity at expense of invention [ see : Faber Academy’s churning out of novelist after novelist, each ca(u)s(u)ally entering publication contracts w/ the mainstream[33]

54) elite then have an ‘obsession with evenness’[34] / literary + sporting elite requesting a ‘conform(ation of) their bodies to the severe prescriptions of their masters’[35]

55) perhaps ‘evenness’ is a suitable trait for writers with nicely balanced lives / writing aside, is balance in life to be aimed for?

56) Ahmed / now / all at sea w/ a discontent toward the submission/submitting to said masters, to that White Male Institution / _ their _ better _ trodden _ easier _ paths_

57) a passion comes to the fore

58) a refusal

59) to |not |let |the |institution w(h)ile away the time /

60) to counter

61) to foul / a Derridean reference amid the referencing of a refusal to be ‘ean’/

62) to do disservice

63) to disobey the ideal Mr Average[36] / or, better; to be Not[37] / [ then again , to be an Ahmedian ‘Not’ might be a performative, self-interested, political act ‘for the sake of appearance’.

64) white dude walks into a bar says hey gurl been reading sara ahmed hbu?

65) tumultuously doubting + all at sea as the most viable, least mindless critical space / a (con)figuring [see, 39] of self + world / to turn away is no less a political act but is this even a turning, or an advocating of listening, or not talking over – an act in which an elite inherently indulge.

66) this is to say : to interact is to both-ways feedback / vulnerably + boldly & not to definitively + universally determine /

67) no preclusion of enjoyment in that^ / arguably more there than in the zone-out of a spectating [ whether or not there is invention in the spectacle, the viewer hardly participates with those Beckettian songs[38] ], than in beach-reading what is purported to be inventive a propos this-or-that bestseller list + taking at its word in an ultimate zone-out / beach reading + pop songs + nightclubs + canons + this-or-that stadium, spectator moves his head with the ball + chants.

68) Sartre points to the absurdity of sport, describing : ‘adults in short pants fighting and throwing themselves on the ground in an attempt to get a leather ball between two wooden posts’[39] .

69) This wilfully ignores the highs of exercise + play [Kessell[40] + Heaney], being from the wrong point of view for that, but effectively describes an experience of spectatorship.

70) speculation : motivation there to expand Stadia + spectacle, to publish more of the same-old w/ token diversity[41] / not to address sports or literary pedagogy

71) not to address a misogynist perception of incapability of women[42], as seen in the assumed masculine pronouns of Mark Edmunson’s pedagogy[43]

72) Edmunson perpetuates the notion that sport is beneficial + educative for sake of typically masculine traits, & in the perception of teamwork + competiveness + determination + teamwork as masculine, women are a) excluded from developing said traits, cue vicious circle, b) excluded from the experience, the fun, of playing in teams [see, 86]

73) some men are weeping for the toxicity of their own masculinity[44] / for the presumption of an ideal body & how to care for it in the strive /

74) women are weeping for the subsequent misdirection of healthcare + research funds to an ideal (male) body, for the persistence of cis-male test subjects + narrowness of resultant research[45]

75) Cape coming to a white male author by the legitimation of an older white male author[46] [ has a literal fathering has occurred in contemporary poetry to cement the metaphor ] / a tokenising occurs as voice is given to L G B T Q +

76) [ News For Poets[47]: publisher features one marginalised voice to account for all forms + variations of marginalisation, to slow claps everywhere ] / if only they were slow claps

77) McMillan voices well that toxicity [the men use the hand dryer to ‘cover their sobs’] / equally, his source of legitimation, his easy assimilation as a white man into the institution, as well as his easy melancholy [ the constant rain + assonance throughout Physical ] makes for a half-way house between bold + safe poetics.

78) It makes for Cape Poetry, a darling son. Legitimation + accessibility marring the ruptures.

79) Rupture : / a break, tear, or split, or breach against continuity / in the fabric of the earth / contra-flow / to [be] hit on the break / invention as a countering, destabilising force<

80) to Eimear McBride’s depiction of male violence as a source of such rupture / ‘mammy leave the hall light. i need to see it through the dark’[48] / hard is the prevailing innocence of the address + of the monosyllabic idiolect / contretemps opened by artificial light unto a normalised dark / illumination as a force for security / calling further upon empathic witness[49] / widely known is that feeling insecure at night / McBride reinvents + re-contextualises that, giving a point of similarity at which to receive + be received [ at which to engage the reader in that tug of war, to engage the reader in vulnerable interaction / to let violence be done to surreptitious hierarchies of western philosophical traditions, to destroy internalised misogyny, bourgeois, homophobia, & racism &c. within[50]

81) perspective in that line as contra too / not from a parental authority nor an omniscient narrator [ omniscient narrator / & that plural first person ‘we find’ in critical work / as White Male construct to inscribe the patriarchal lack of emotiveness [as a supposed demonstration of reason] that Anne Carson demonstrates is attempted in the male voice[51]]

82) Similarly: Vahni Capildeo writes on the persistence of a heritage question: ‘what about VS Naipaul? […] what about possible Soviet connexions for VS Naipual?’[52], on being put in a box and not being taken at one’s word but interrogated. Capildeo makes a point of reference here for the reader – not as a patronisation, but a grabbing by the arm + pulling them up [see 17] – interrogation is reinvented in the context of foreignness and immigration [or rather, racial difference + actual nativity / necessarily Vahni Capildeo as to invent in conveying an alien experience to swathes of the audience. Yet, is there a privileged assumption in ‘reference points’ that white men are welcome in the audience, even the natural audience, as opposed to it being written for the sake of solidarity?

83) Similarly : Claudia Rankine recontextualises invisibility, as a point of reference, then solidifies that demanding of empathic witness via the second person pronoun, reinventing the reader’s very perspective; a choice arguably explained by that homogenising, phallogocentric force of omniscient plural pronouns ‘we, us’ and ‘they’. There is an ambiguity, liminality, even, to the singular (seen) / plural (invisible, crowed out) state of the second person. That play offers a process of figuring out to the reader, + is therefore appropriately liberating and ‘bizarro’[53].<

84) & yet / taken on by Graywolf Press [ itself a mainstream, homogenising force if ever there was ] / obsessed with their commerciality, evidenced by the publication of James Franco / not work believed in for invention but for how easily assimilated it will be into popular opinion [ see also, that the opposite is true, post-backlash a mainstream publisher will pull the work from publication, & that was desirable but made clear that the editor was not publishing for the sake of belief in a work, and even tried to divorce publication from belief in a work’s invention and progressiveness, but for the sake of what they thought a public would want to hear, or automatically purchase][54]

85) at what point is the hierarchical mainstreaming of oppressed minorities celebrated / when is women’s football celebrated / Football Association [only lately permitting boys + girls to be on the same pitch] / Graywolf / Faber & Faber / each after 🍪🍪🍪for a bare minimum degree of acceptance, women do not receive sport funding because people do not want to watch women because women have not received the appropriate funding or teaching.

86) Women’s football is then devalued to the spectator’s eye for being on less well-kept pitches, for the smallness of competitions [Man Utd , one of the three richest clubs globally, still refuse a women’s team],

87) and the vicious circle continues.

88) is there a reluctance to infringe upon the misogynist space, the permissibility of violence & abuse [ I have chanted ‘Andrew Johnson is a wanker! is a wanker!’ ]

89) a Sisyphean mainstream as stands / tokens rolling rocks over + over / folks returning + re-returning to institutions & their spectacles / premier league fan w/out on-field invention/grappling w/ a cricked neck [ball watching cliché] in cycle of win-lose-win-lose-win-win-lose to point of absurdity

90) alternative : return to irregularity of play [ to a plurality of breathless ‘skids in the dark’ | furtherance of an inclusivity of play via pedagogical upheaval[55]

 

90+1) citing of Heaney [ & Sartre & Derrida, & Eliot, & Attridge, & Brohm & Beckett & Fowler & — undermining / uncovering. Or embedded / determined. Or endorsing WMI?

 

90+2) or a demand a propos #80 for progression out of the poem’s nostalgia, that sport & literature nostalgia pertain not only to boys /

 

90+3) or performatively, blatantly, a dive. Robben goes down, wolf-cried foul

 

90+4) the referee pulls me up on m—

 

90+5)

 

 

 

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[1] Patrick Pinkerton, Beyond the touchline there is nothing: Derrida and sport (2015) <https://everydaydeconstructions.wordpress.com/2015/04/17/beyond-the-touchline-there-is-nothing-derrida-and-sport/> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[2] Jacques Derrida, ‘The Law of Genre, in Acts of Literature, ed. by Derek Attridge (London: Routledge, 1992), p.251

[3] Derek Attridge, ‘Innovation, Literature, Ethics: Relating to the Other’, PMLA, 114.1, (1999), 20-31 (p. 21), in Ethics and Literary Study <http://www.jstor.org/stable/463424> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[4] George Lakoff, Mark Johnsen, ‘Challenges to Metaphorical Coherence’, in Metaphors We Live By (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press , 1980 (2003)), p. 44

[5] to be read as ‘= with a strikethrough’, rather than ‘not equal to’

[6] Jean Marie Brohm, ‘The Myth of Educative Sport’, in Sport : A Prison of Measured Time, trans. by Ian Fraser, 2nd edn. (Worcester: Pluto Press, 1978), p. 11

[7] “equip, v.”. OED Online. (Oxford University Press: June 2017). <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/63778?> [accessed December 18, 2017].

[8] “-ment, suffix”. OED Online. (Oxford University Press : June 2017). <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/116535> [accessed December 18, 2017].

[9] Seamus Heaney, ‘Markings’, ll. 1,4, 13, 17, in Seeing Things, 30th edn. (London: Faber & Faber, 1991), p. 8-9

[10] James Meikle, ITV Apologises for Clanger after 1.5 Million Viewers Miss England Goal (June 2010) <https://www.theguardian.com/media/2010/jun/13/itv-apologises-england-goal-advert> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[11] Alex Massie, Robert Green’s World Cup Error May Never Be Forgiven (June 2010) <https://www.thedailybeast.com/robert-greens-world-cup-error-may-never-be-forgiven> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[12] Ken Loach, Eric Cantona’s Favourite Moment (2009) <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_uzU85htH4> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[13] Jacques Derrida , ‘The Law of Genre’, in Acts of Literature, ed. by Derek Attridge(London: Routledge , 1992), p. 230

[14] Derek Attridge, ‘Innovation, Literature, Ethics: Relating to the Other’, PMLA, 114.1, (1999), 20-31 (p. 22), in Ethics and Literary Study <http://www.jstor.org/stable/463424> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[15] There is an interesting parallel in the semantic fields of two often considered meaningless acts : sport and war / if the absurdity holds true in an analysis of the language of war it would make for a disturbing essay indeed, given the more wide-reaching, devastating consequences. War as sport, sport as war, absurd in equal measure.

[16] Ali Ahamada 90+5 (2012) <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aZdy8Cm07s> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[17] Clare Connors, ‘Derrida and the Friendship of Rhyme’, The Oxford Literary Review, 33.2, (2011), 139-149 (p. 141).

[18] Jean-Phillipe Toussaint, Football, trans. by Shaun Whiteside (London: Fitzcarraldo Editions, 2016), p. 24.

[19] Sarah Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017), p. 12.

[20] T.S. Eliot, Dante, 2nd edn (London: Faber & Faber, 1965), p. 8.

[21] Derek Attridge, ‘Innovation, Literature, Ethics: Relating to the Other’, PMLA, 114.1, (1999), 20-31 (p. 23), in Ethics and Literary Study <http://www.jstor.org/stable/463424> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[22] “score, n.”. OED Online, (Oxford University Press: June 2017) <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/173033?rskey=PXE6b5&result=1&isAdvanced=false> [accessed December 18, 2017].

[23] Jacques Derrida, ‘Aphorism Countertime’, in Acts of Literature, ed. by Derek Attridge(London: Routledge, 1992), p. 419

[24] Google Dictionary, Kerfuffle (2017) <https://www.google.co.uk/search?safe=active&q=Dictionary#dobs=kerfuffle> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[25] Rosa Campbell, ‘Second Person’, ll. 14-15, archives / v2.1 : Rosa Campbell (2017) <http://www.haverthorn.co.uk/hview/archivesv21-rosa-campbell> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[26] Molly Bergin, Sun & other poems (2017) <http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/mollybergin/> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[27] Steven J Fowler, ‘Laid out flat upon my back’, ll. 14-16, in {Enthusiasm} (London: Test Centre, 2015), p. 17

[28] Ibid., ll. 11-12.

[29] Samuel Beckett, Waiting For Godot (London: Faber & Faber, 2006), p. 4.

[30] Jean Marie Brohm, ‘The Myth of Educative Sport’, in Sport : A Prison of Measured Time, trans. by Ian Fraser, 2nd edn. (Worcester: Pluto Press, 1978), p. 14

[31] Sarah Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017), p. 12.

[32] Faber, Faber & Faber to publish second novel of prize-winning Eimear McBride (September 2015) <https://www.faber.co.uk/blog/new-novel-by-eimear-mcbride/> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[33] Faber, Success Stories (2017) <https://www.faberacademy.co.uk/faber-academy-publishing-deals-and-success-stories> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[34] Eimear McBride, Eimear McBride w/ Gabriel Flynn (2017) <http://www.haverthorn.co.uk/hview/gabriel-flynn-w-eimear-mcbride> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[35] Jean Marie Brohm, ‘The Myth of Educative Sport’, in Sport : A Prison of Measured Time, trans. by Ian Fraser, 2nd edn. (Worcester: Pluto Press, 1978), p. 28

[36] Ibid., p. 26

[37] Sarah Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017), p. 15.

[38] Samuel Beckett, Waiting For Godot (London: Faber & Faber, 2006), p. 4.

[39] Jean-Paul Sartre, ‘The Stranger Explained’, in We Only Have This Life to Live: The Selected Essays of Jean-Paul Sartre 1939 – 1975, ed. by Ronald Aronson, and Adrian Van Den Hoven(New York: New York Review of Books, 2013), p. 39

[40] Anna Kessel, ‘Sweating is so hot right now!’ in Eat, Sweat, Play(London: Pan Macmillan, 2016), p. 28-64 (p.59)

[41] Sarah Ahmed, Living a Feminist Life (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017), p. 94.

[42] Anna Kessel, ‘How to bunk a PE lesson’, in Eat, Sweat, Play (London: Pan Macmillan, 2016), p. 1-27

[43] Mark Edmunson, ‘Do Sports Build Character?’, in Why Teach?(New York: Bloomsbury, 2013), p. 68-84

[44] Andrew McMillan, ‘The Men are Weeping in the Gym’, in Physical(London: Cape Poetry, 2015), p. 4

[45] Anna Kessel, ‘Sport and Taboos’, in Eat, Sweat, Play (London: Pan Macmillan, 2016), p. 95-124

[46] Ian McMillan is the father of Andrew McMillan.

[47] A popular Twitter account.

[48] Eimear McBride, A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing (London: Faber & Faber, 2014), p. 29.

[49] Scherezade Siobhan, Malpaís / Badlands / Majesty (2017) <https://sharkpackpoetry.com/2017/08/11/malpais-badlands-majesty/> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[50] Eimear McBride, Eimear McBride w/ Gabriel Flynn (2017) <http://www.haverthorn.co.uk/hview/gabriel-flynn-w-eimear-mcbride> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[51] Anne Carson, ‘The Gender of Sound’, in Glass, Irony, and God(New York: New Directions Press, 1995), p. 120

[52] Vahni Capildeo, ‘Kassandra #memoryandtrauma #livingilionstyle’, in Measures of Expatriation(Manchester: Carcanet, 2016), p. 63

[53] Dan Chiasson, Colour Codes (October 2014) <https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/27/color-codes> [accessed 18 December 2017].

[54] Theodor Adorno, The Culture Industry (London: Routledge, 2001), p. 106.

[55] Anna Kessel, ‘How to bunk a PE lesson’, in Eat, Sweat, Play (London: Pan Macmillan, 2016), p. 1-27